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“Privacy should not be a luxurious asset,” says Google CEO

Sundar Pichai, Google CEO, launched an editorial in The New York Times. The column focused on the company’s view of Mountain View regarding privacy. Google thinks that “privacy should not be a luxurious commodity,” in what is a clear bar to Apple.

For the CEO of Google, the view is that privacy can not be only available to those who purchase premium products and content . At the last Apple event, one of the biggest foci was also the privacy advertised in the new products and services. However, this is only within the reach of anyone within the ecosystem.

Sundar Pichai Google
Sundar Pichai, CEO of Google

This is where companies like Google and Apple separate. Both are giving great value to privacy, but the Mountain View company is concerned that this is a reality for everyone.

In the voice of its CEO, Google is privileged because billions of people trust their products. We all use Research, which is inheritable. But if Chrome is the most used browser, Android is also the operating system that most consumers have on their smartphone.

android q

Google wants to give you more power over the information you can collect about yourself.

“For the past 20 years, people have relied on Google to answer questions they would not ask their closest friend,” Sundar Pichai writes. Google does not just want to continue to earn that trust. information it collects from you.

The anonymous way we know about Chrome is now available on Youtube. The idea is that you can surf at will, without logging in. According to the company announced in the Google I / O event, Maps is also preparing to receive an anonymous navigation mode soon.

The idea passed by Sundar Pichai is that Google never sells information to third parties. And that you control how that information is used. These are data that improve your experience and allow you to ask Maps to tell you the way home without telling you where you live.

Google Maps

The ads that Google shows you only come from searches you do

Your data is what allows Google to provide you with the best ads. These ads pay for a free trial. And according to Google’s CEO, these are generated only by data you’ve researched in the past. And not for private Gmail data, for example.

It’s also in Google’s DNA to create products accessible to everyone. See not only the example of Search or Maps, but also of Android GO. On smartphones that appeal to a consumer with few possessions, Google offers the pure Android experience.

The privacy policies announced by Google a week ago give you the choice of how long you want your data to be recorded. Google also thinks that the United States should create legislation similar to that in Europe in terms of data protection. That is, soon we will be able to see a RGPD (General Regulation of the Protection of Data) in the United States.

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Nandini Singh
From a very young age I was interested in computers and technology in general, I had my first computer at the age of 10 and at 15 I set up my first tower, since then I have never stopped. Whatever technology, I'm in the front row to know more.