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Israeli company says it can unlock any iOS or Android device

Cellebrite, an Israeli forensic company, has developed a system capable of unlocking any iPhone, iPad or Android device. The company is so confident that it shared on Twitter the new version of its service, called UFED Premium (Universal Forensic Extraction Apparatus).

This service is sold to the police or even governments, with the intention of unlocking equipment belonging to criminals or that may contain sensitive information.

However, it is not the first time that Cellebrite has stood out because of its unlocking system. In 2016, the company was known for allegedly collaborating with the FBI to unlock the iPhone 5C from a terrorist, something that Apple refused to do.

What data will the UFED Premium access

In the official website , Cellebrite explains that UFED will allow authorities to access third-party data, conversations, saved emails with their attachments and even deleted content from the mobile phone.

Cellebrite also detailed that UFED can unlock iOS devices from version 7 to the recent 12.3. Regarding Android, the only models mentioned were from the Samsung Galaxy S6 to the Galaxy S9. Huawei and Xiaomi were also mentioned.

Some people consider this type of privacy violation service

This type of services and appliances exist in a gray moral area. In the comments of the publication we have the majority of users disagreeing with the ethics of Cellebrite.

A very pertinent comment states that it was preferable to sell these services to Apple or Google to make mobile phones safer. On the other hand this would make the equipment impenetrable, giving more power to malicious individuals.

The question is: To what extent is it morally ethical for authorities or government to unlock personal equipment in search of information? Only in cases of crime or terrorism? What if there are only suspicions? Leave your opinion in the comments.

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Nandini Singh
From a very young age I was interested in computers and technology in general, I had my first computer at the age of 10 and at 15 I set up my first tower, since then I have never stopped. Whatever technology, I'm in the front row to know more.